Worshiping at the Manger

I think about how great of a sacrifice that must have been for Jesus to give up all He had for a manger. For that alone, He deserves our worship. As you can imagine, the angels were ecstatic and had to spread the good news. They came down from Heaven declaring “Glory to God!” “A Savior has been born!” and people as lowly as shepherds headed over to the stable to figure out what all the fuss was about. Later on, the wise men came to give Jesus rich gifts and sacrifices. The first thing the manger shows us about worship is that it is to be expressed by all people. No matter the phase in life you find yourself in, Jesus has made room for you by the manger.

Shanna Blaede
Where there is no Wonder, there is no Worship

Our ability to worship God is directly connected to our revelation of who He is and this revelation gives birth to wonder. According to the dictionary, the word “wonder” is both a verb and a noun. As a noun, it’s that tension between feeling both surprise and admiration “caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable.” This perfectly describes Jesus, the object of our worship.

Derek Kirkman
Lift Up Your Hands

I love the 134th Psalm. I also love the Holidays. As Christmas approaches, I find myself reminiscing about what the past year has brought and wonder what the new year will bring.

It’s during those long, dark nights of December that I find solace in worship. The writer of Psalms 134 blessed the Lord in the dark of night by raising his hands in the sanctuary.

Jordan Work